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Freddie Gray: Baltimore residents react to criminal charges brought against six officers




BALTIMORE, MD - MAY 01: Lorning Cornish celebrates at the corner of West North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue after Baltimore authorities released a report on the death of Freddie Gray while police in riot gear stand guard on May 1, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore City state's attorney, ruled the death of Freddie Gray a homicide and that criminal charges will be filed. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - MAY 01: Lorning Cornish celebrates at the corner of West North Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue after Baltimore authorities released a report on the death of Freddie Gray while police in riot gear stand guard on May 1, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore City state's attorney, ruled the death of Freddie Gray a homicide and that criminal charges will be filed. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Win McNamee/Getty Images

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Earlier today in Baltimore, Maryland, State Attorney Marilyn Mosby announced criminal charges against six officers who were suspended following the death of Freddie Gray.

Mosby declared Gray's arrest illegal because the officers didn't have probable cause to detain him. She added that the officers' treatment of Gray while he was in their custody warranted charges of murder and manslaughter, and called on the public to remain calm.

Kenneth Burns, a reporter with NPR station WYPR in Baltimore, joined Take Two for a look at how Baltimore residents have been reacting to the news.