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Senate's blocking of Pacific trade deal shows divide among Democrats




A food market in Singapore in 2012. The U.S. government says that American farmers can help
A food market in Singapore in 2012. The U.S. government says that American farmers can help "fill the void" being created by rising demand for meat in countries like Singapore through the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but there's fierce opposition to the deal in the U.S. among unions, environmental groups and some Democratic lawmakers.
/Allie Caulfield/Flickr

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A key trade deal that President Barack Obama has made a top priority hit a roadblock in Congress this week, revealing a split among Democratic lawmakers and hinting at an uncertain future for the pact. The Transpacific Partnership deal would cover 12 nations, including the U.S. and countries in Southeast Asia and Latin America, and affect about 40 percent of the world's trade.

Running up against opposition in Congress is nothing new for President Obama, but there's a twist: it was Democrats, led by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who cast the crucial votes to derail legislation that would fast-track approval of the plan.

For more we're joined by Paul Kane, congressional reporter with the Washington Post.