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Ezell Ford case raises questions about transparency in LA's police shooting review process




A protest sign showing and image of Ezell Ford as members of the 'Black Lives Matter' alliance stage protest outside the Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's home as they try to force him to fire LAPD Police Chief Charlie Beck, in Los Angeles, California on June 7, 2015. The alliance have renewed protests after a recent report from an LAPD watchdog determined that the August 11, 2014 officer-involved shooting death of 25-year-old Ezell Ford in South Central was justified.
A protest sign showing and image of Ezell Ford as members of the 'Black Lives Matter' alliance stage protest outside the Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's home as they try to force him to fire LAPD Police Chief Charlie Beck, in Los Angeles, California on June 7, 2015. The alliance have renewed protests after a recent report from an LAPD watchdog determined that the August 11, 2014 officer-involved shooting death of 25-year-old Ezell Ford in South Central was justified.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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Yesterday the Los Angeles Police Commission found that one officer was wrong to use deadly force last summer in the fatal shooting of Ezell Ford. 

The commission's review was made in private yesterday after a heated, hours-long public comment period. Now it's up to police chief Charlie Beck to determine what punishment, if any, the officer will face.

Joe Domanick, Associate Director of the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and author of the forthcoming book "Blue: The LAPD and the Battle To Redeem American Policing," and Michael Gennaco, Principal at OIR Group, join Take Two for a discussion about the transparency of L.A.'s process for reviewing police shootings.