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How should journalists report on the issue of gay marriage?




Participants wait for the start of the 2015 New York City Pride march in New York on June 28, 2015. Under a sea of rainbow flags, hundreds of thousands of jubilant supporters poured onto New York's streets for the annual Gay Pride March, two days after the US Supreme Court's landmark ruling to legalize gay marriage.
Participants wait for the start of the 2015 New York City Pride march in New York on June 28, 2015. Under a sea of rainbow flags, hundreds of thousands of jubilant supporters poured onto New York's streets for the annual Gay Pride March, two days after the US Supreme Court's landmark ruling to legalize gay marriage.
Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

In reporting on the Supreme Court's historic decision on same sex marriage, the media has taken a mostly positive view. But has it been striking the right tone?

Historically, journalists are taught to keep their personal and political opinions under wraps. Others argue that line of thinking is dishonest and outdated.

So, is it OK for a radio show host to tweet about his excitement over #lovewins? Or when newspaper reporter puts a rainbow filter on her Facebook profile photo?

How about bold headlines, such as this example from the Montgomery Advertiser?

Elizabeth Spayd is the editor and publisher at the Columbia Journalism Review, and helps us navigate some of these questions.