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How we understand tragic events




People line up to pay their respects during a prayer service for the victims of The Grand 16 theater shooting at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, in Lafayette, La., Sunday, July 26, 2015. John Russell Houser stood up about 20 minutes into Thursday night's showing of
People line up to pay their respects during a prayer service for the victims of The Grand 16 theater shooting at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, in Lafayette, La., Sunday, July 26, 2015. John Russell Houser stood up about 20 minutes into Thursday night's showing of "Trainwreck" and fired on the audience with a semi-automatic handgun. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Gerald Herbert/AP

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When tragic shootings occur, like the one that happened in Louisiana last week, we find it almost impossible to fathom. It shakes us to our very core. As humans, we are wired to seek meaning, even if events are random. Laurence Miller, a forensic and criminal police psychologist in Florida who has also treated victims of trauma, spoke to A Martinez about how we process such events.

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio player above.