News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

One year after Ferguson, have police reforms worked?




FERGUSON, MO -  MARCH 4: Protestors demonstrate outside the Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson, Missouri on March 4, 2015. The Federal Department of Justice decided today not to charge then Ferguson Police Officer, Darren Wilson, of any wrongdoing in the August shooting of Michael Brown Jr. The Department of Justice investigation did happen to find Ferguson Police Departments involvement in racially based policing. (Photo by Michael Thomas/Getty Images)
FERGUSON, MO - MARCH 4: Protestors demonstrate outside the Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson, Missouri on March 4, 2015. The Federal Department of Justice decided today not to charge then Ferguson Police Officer, Darren Wilson, of any wrongdoing in the August shooting of Michael Brown Jr. The Department of Justice investigation did happen to find Ferguson Police Departments involvement in racially based policing. (Photo by Michael Thomas/Getty Images)
Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

Listen to story

03:53
Download this story 1MB

It's been nearly a year since a white police officer shot and killed a black 18 year old in Ferguson, Missouri.

The killing of Michael Brown and protests led to renewed attention on police conduct.

Since then, lawmakers in nearly every state across the country have put forward measures to change or improve how police work with local communities. But have the efforts led to reform?

The AP's David Lieb took a look at many of the new laws and policies that came after the Ferguson shooting, and he joined the show with more.

To listen to the full interview, click the blue audio player above.