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Ronda Rousey's reputation of dominance




FILE - This July 15, 2015, file photo shows mixed martial arts fighter Ronda Rousey working out at Glendale Fighting Club in Glendale, Calif. Rousey's star power grows with each month, and the UFC's dominant bantamweight champion could have held her next title defense anywhere. She chose to travel to Bethe Correia's native Brazil for UFC 190 on Saturday, Aug. 1, just so she can embarrass the challenger in front of her home fans. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong,File)
FILE - This July 15, 2015, file photo shows mixed martial arts fighter Ronda Rousey working out at Glendale Fighting Club in Glendale, Calif. Rousey's star power grows with each month, and the UFC's dominant bantamweight champion could have held her next title defense anywhere. She chose to travel to Bethe Correia's native Brazil for UFC 190 on Saturday, Aug. 1, just so she can embarrass the challenger in front of her home fans. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong,File)
Jae C. Hong/AP

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People are calling Mixed Martial Artist Ronda Rousey one of the best fighters -- male or female -- of all time.

She has no equal in the UFC.  In fact, her next fight is against an opponent she's already beaten twice, yet it's considered a decent matchup.

Ben Fowlkes, columnist for USA Today and the MMA Junkie blog, joined the show to discuss the benefits and drawbacks of Rousey's dominance.