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Could Trump widen the gender gap among GOP voters?




Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump (right) and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speak together during a commercial break at the first Republican presidential debate in Cleveland on Thursday. Trump's remarks about Fox News debate moderator Megyn Kelly have triggered a firestorm.
Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump (right) and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speak together during a commercial break at the first Republican presidential debate in Cleveland on Thursday. Trump's remarks about Fox News debate moderator Megyn Kelly have triggered a firestorm.
Andrew Harnik/AP

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Donald Trump has no patience for political correctness, and he’s proud of it. So when Fox’s Megyn Kelly pressed him on his disparaging comments about women at last week’s GOP debate, the real estate mogul went on the offensive. But he didn’t stop there.

In a phone interview with CNN, Trump lobbed criticism at Kelly, stating that she had ‘blood coming out of her wherever.’ The remarks sparked a fierce backlash from women on both sides of the political aisle.

Advisors to Trump likely breathed a collective sigh of relief, when recent polls revealed that the candidate was relatively unscathed by his remarks.

There is, however, no metric for calculating the number of female voters who may now have a diminished view of the Republican Party.

Take Two spoke with Karlyn Bowman, senior fellow at the conservative think tank American Enterprise Institute, about the GOP’s past and future challenges with female voters.

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