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'Sorry I'm not sorry': The art of the (non) apology




Actress Daniele Watts and Brian Lucas speak during an interview with KABC-TV in Los Angeles, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. The Los Angeles Police Department said Sunday that officers detained Watts and her companion last week after a complaint that two people were
Actress Daniele Watts and Brian Lucas speak during an interview with KABC-TV in Los Angeles, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2014. The Los Angeles Police Department said Sunday that officers detained Watts and her companion last week after a complaint that two people were "involved in indecent exposure" in a silver Mercedes. Watts was detained until police determined no crime was committed. (AP Photo/KABC-TV)
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When you're sorry but not really sorry, what happens? A judge tells you to do it again.

Last year, actress Daniele Watts was caught canoodling with her boyfriend in a parked car in Studio City, California.

Watts, who is black, pulled the race card with the responding police officer. She claimed the cops saw her and her boyfriend, who's white, and assumed she was a prostitute.

She eventually took a deal, pleading no contest to disturbing the peace. Part of that deal, though, was to write an apology letter to the officer. She did -- but it turns out the judge was not impressed. The judge ordered her to write a better one by Aug. 25.

Joining Take Two to discuss: