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Environment & Science

Valley, Butte fires: Here's how to evacuate pets




A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
Courtesy John Madigan, UC Davis VERT
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Valley Fire, September 2015.
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
A cat is reunited with its owner after being rescued from the fires in Northern California, September 2015.
Courtesy John Madigan, UC Davis VERT
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
Wilbur and Sophie recover after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
Courtesy John Madigan, UC Davis VERT
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
Baby goats are seen after being rescued from the Valley Fire, September 2015.
Courtesy John Madigan, UC Davis VERT
A cat recovers after being rescued from the Butte Fire, September 2015.
Horses are seen during animal rescue efforts in the Valley, Butte fires, September 2015.


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Most people were able to evacuate safely from the Valley and Butte fires, which erupted in Northern California last week.

But for some, doing so meant leaving beloved animals behind. Enter the UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team, lead by John Madigan. The team has been helping pets and domestic animals abandoned in the chaos.

"One of the challenges is the amount of notification that you have that you may have to evacuate," said Madigan. "In this instance, which was very, very different from the majority of the fires that occur in California, is that people had no warning."

While at times there may be no warning when disaster strikes, Madigan shared tips on how to help prepare to evacuate your animals:

Madigan offers more suggestions on  preparing to evacuate animals here. Though the tips focus on horses, he says they are universal principles that can be applied to other animals.

If you'd like to donate to the UC Davis animal rescue efforts, click here.