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Crab fishermen wait for toxic algae bloom to clear




SAN FRANCISCO - NOVEMBER 17:  A Dungeness Crab sits in a bin after being offloaded from a fishing vessel on November 17, 2010 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - NOVEMBER 17: A Dungeness Crab sits in a bin after being offloaded from a fishing vessel on November 17, 2010 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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A toxic algae bloom appeared along the West Coast this spring. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said that it may be the largest ever recorded, as it stretched from California to Alaska and was as deep as 650 feet.

Even more concerning was the effect that its toxins were having on the Dungeness Crab, a popular animal that fishermen gathered. With this week marking the beginning of crab fishing season in  California, Vera Trainer, a research oceanographer with NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center, spoke to host A Martinez about the current status of the algae’s effect on local crab-life.

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio player above.