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The implications of Mexico's latest ruling on marijuana




Nabor, a small-scale marijuana grower in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinoloa, checks his plants. As legal pot increasingly becomes available in the U.S., Americans appear to be buying more that is grown domestically. Prices for marijuana from Mexico have fallen sharply.
Nabor, a small-scale marijuana grower in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinoloa, checks his plants. As legal pot increasingly becomes available in the U.S., Americans appear to be buying more that is grown domestically. Prices for marijuana from Mexico have fallen sharply.
John Burnett/NPR

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Mexico's Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that it is legal to produce and consume marijuana for personal use. In what lawyers call a narrow ruling, the decision only applies to the four members of an advocacy group who brought the case forward. But there are signs that it could lead to an over all decriminalization of weed in the country. 

This could have huge implications for Mexico, which has frequently faced marijuana-related issues, including incarcerations and drug cartel violence.

Brad Rowe, a policy analyst who studies and writes about drugs and violence in Mexico, joined the show to explain more.

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio  player above.