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Kendrec McDade's mother says report doesn't provide closure




In this undated family photo, Kendrec McDade, then a high school student, is seen wearing his Aztecs Football team uniform. McDade was shot by police after being chased and making a move, reaching toward his waistband, according to police.
In this undated family photo, Kendrec McDade, then a high school student, is seen wearing his Aztecs Football team uniform. McDade was shot by police after being chased and making a move, reaching toward his waistband, according to police.
McDade Family File Photo

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After a three-year court battle, the mother of Kendrec McDade this week received a copy of an independent report on her son's shooting death.

Anya Slaughter has been trying for years now to find out just what happened to her son. On March 24, 2012, Pasadena officers responded to a 911 call about a suspected armed robbery. That night, they fatally shot 19-year-old McDade, who was unarmed. 

The officers involved in the case were cleared after an internal investigation. In 2014, an independent report on the incident and the subsequent investigation by the police department was presented to the city of Pasadena. But that report was not made public, prompting Slaughter's legal fight. 

Even though she fought for three years to see it, she said the report doesn't provide any closure. The Office of Independent Review, who published the report, found 10 tactical decisions questionable, including officers not communicating with one another when trying to apprehend McDade, and the officers splitting up when they tried to detain him.  

"Basically all 10 of those things I already knew," she said. "I've been expressing these things forever, and I guess no one wanted to believe me. I am glad that it's out now so I can get some belief behind it, but most of those 10 things, I already knew."

What would bring her relief, she said, is not seeing any other mothers go through what she's been through.

"That's been my goal since I really started to try to fight this, and really was able to comprehend and assess this," she said. "I grew up in Pasadena. This has been going on ever since I've been there."

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio player above.



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