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The psychology and behavioral economics behind sports




OSTON, MA - FEBRUARY 1:  New England Patriots fans cheer after the  Patriots defeated the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX at Jerry Remy's Sports Bar February 1, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
OSTON, MA - FEBRUARY 1: New England Patriots fans cheer after the Patriots defeated the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX at Jerry Remy's Sports Bar February 1, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

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It is really hard to lead a team to a Super Bowl win.

Only 31 people in the world can say they are a Super Bowl winning quarterback. It takes a strong arm, smarts, leadership skills and....supermodel looks?

Consider some these Super Bowl winning quarterbacks and picture their square jaws: Tom Brady, Joe Montana, Joe Namath, etc.

All very handsome, all very successful. 

But is it just coincidence that a lot quarterbacks are really good looking OR is there something buried in our heads that makes us desire for the leaders of our football teams to look like dashing leading men?

L. Jon Wertheim co-wrote a book with Sam Sommers tackling this and more, it's called This is your Brain on Sports. In the book they explore the science of underdogs, the value of rivalry and what we can learn from the t-shirt cannon.

To hear the full interview, click the blue play button above.