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New report disputes Mexican government's account of missing students




A man holds a banner that reads in Spanish
A man holds a banner that reads in Spanish "Justice," during a march by parents and relatives of 43 missing students who were killed, in Iguala, Mexico.
Rebecca Blackwell/AP

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Findings this week from a team of Argentine forensic experts directly contradict the official version of what happened to 43 students who went missing after being taken by police in September 2014.

After the students disappeared near the town of Iguala, Mexico in the south of the country, the Mexican government said they had been captured by police on their way to a protest, set on fire and dumped nearby – at least that is what the government's attorney general said the following year, calling it the "historic truth." But a long-awaited report released Tuesday based on a forensic probe into the evidence says the remains at the dump are not connected to the missing students.

"The families never bought it, they always said the investigation was a white-wash, that not enough effort was being made to look for their children," said Jo Tuckman, Latin American Bureau Chief for VICE News, who covered the new report this week. "While this case is particularly terrible and particularly symbolic, there are thousands and thousands of people missing in Mexico over the last few years."

RELATED: For LA families, search for Mexico's missing spans borders

Nansi Cisneros holds a piece of embroidery that she brought back from Jalisco, Mexico, part of a project to honor the missing in Mexico. The piece reads, 'Embroidery for Peace, Los Angeles,' in Spanish.
Nansi Cisneros holds a piece of embroidery that she brought back from Jalisco, Mexico, part of a project to honor the missing in Mexico. The piece reads, 'Embroidery for Peace, Los Angeles,' in Spanish.
Dorian Merina/KPCC