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Study: California's prison realignment act had little to no impact on crime




New court decisions in recent years have chipped away at the principle that you
New court decisions in recent years have chipped away at the principle that you "have the right to remain silent" upon arrest.
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As crime rates started to tick up last year in Los Angeles, some law enforcement officers pointed the finger at re-alignment.

The controversial Public Safety Realignment Act, passed five years ago that - in an effort to reduce California's prison population. The realignment shifted responsibility for low-level offenders from the state to the county level.

In the first three years after that change was made, officials reported that nearly 25-thousand inmates were released in L.A. County alone.

But now a large-scale study by researchers from major California universities found that the downsizing had no impact on major crime.

Charis Kubrin and Carroll Serron are professors of criminology at UC Irvine, together they edited the report, which takes up an entire issue of  The Annals of the American Academy of Political & Social Science published today.

Serron and Kubrin joined the show to discuss.

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