News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

Can Apple unlock one iPhone without threatening the security of all its devices?




CUPERTINO, CA - SEPTEMBER 09:  Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller announcees the new iPhone 6 during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California. Apple unveiled the two new iPhones the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
CUPERTINO, CA - SEPTEMBER 09: Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller announcees the new iPhone 6 during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California. Apple unveiled the two new iPhones the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Listen to story

05:34
Download this story 2MB

The fight between Apple and the government over access to the iPhone of San Bernardino mass shooter Syed Rizwan Farook has dominated headlines.

The FBI wants to access to the data on Farook's phone but cannot access it without a passcode. A judge ordered Apple to help the feds, Apple said no and, now, the DOJ has entered the fray, filing a motion Friday for Apple to comply, arguing that the company is "not above the law." 

The one question that calls for clarification is whether it is actually feasible for Apple to do what the FBI wants, and help unlock one phone without endangering the security of all phones? Apple has said it's not but Feds have pushed back on that point. 

Peter Bright is Technology Editor for Ars Technica and talks to Host Alex Cohen about the technology involved in unlocking one phone for the FBI.