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Digital divide could leave a third of Americans behind this election year




DURHAM, NH - FEBRUARY 04:  Democratic presidential candidates former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders during their MSNBC Democratic Candidates Debate at the University of New Hampshire on February 4, 2016 in Durham, New Hampshire. This is the final debate for the Democratic candidates before the New Hampshire primaries.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
DURHAM, NH - FEBRUARY 04: Democratic presidential candidates former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders during their MSNBC Democratic Candidates Debate at the University of New Hampshire on February 4, 2016 in Durham, New Hampshire. This is the final debate for the Democratic candidates before the New Hampshire primaries. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Hot on the heels of his victory in Michigan, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton will gather in Miami tonight for another debate-- this one set to simulcast on both Univision and CNN

Florida is a critical state for both campaigns: 

246 delegates are at stake. 

And there is no second place. 

While television continues to play a major role in political campaigns, the internet has become an essential source of political news.

But about a third of Americans don't have a broadband connection in their home.

That's raised new concerns about the gap known as the "digital divide."

For a closer look at the challenges facing voters who don't have easy internet access, senior researcher with Pew Research Center John Horrigan, joined the show to discuss. 

To hear the full segment, click the blue play button above.