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What AlphaGo's victory means for the future of artificial intelligence




SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 10:  In this handout image provided by Google, South Korean professional Go player Lee Se-Dol (R) puts his first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Google DeepMind Challenge Match on March 10, 2016 in Seoul, South Korea. Lee Se-dol is playing a five-match series against a computer program developed by a Google, AlphaGo.  (Photo by Google via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 10: In this handout image provided by Google, South Korean professional Go player Lee Se-Dol (R) puts his first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Google DeepMind Challenge Match on March 10, 2016 in Seoul, South Korea. Lee Se-dol is playing a five-match series against a computer program developed by a Google, AlphaGo. (Photo by Google via Getty Images)
Handout/Getty Images

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The score now: computer, two, human Go master, zero.

An artificial intelligence system built by Google DeepMind has been going head-to-head with one of the world's greatest players of the Chinese board game Go.

With origins that extend back 2,500 years, Go is thought to be the most complex board game ever devised.

Experts thought it wouldn't be possible for a computer to beat a skilled human at the game for another decade.

The second defeat is a part of the five-game match series in which AlphaGo and Sedol face off in Seoul, South Korea.

The first match clocked in at an impressive three hours and 33 minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFr3K2DORc8

While the second match lasted four hours and 22 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-GsfyVCBu0

CNET's senior editor, Ashley Esqueda, joined the show to talk about why this is such a big deal and the future of artificial intelligence.

AlphaGo and Lee Sedol will be facing off again on Friday, March 11 at 7:30 pm PT. You can watch it live here.

Audio coming soon.



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