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The grapes of drought: Lessons from French wineries




 A worker inspects cabernet sauvignon wine grapes at the Stags' Leap Winery September 27, 2004 in Napa, California. The 2004 California wine harvest kicked off during the last week of July, at least two weeks ahead of schedule due to unusually warm weather at the beginning of March, which triggered budbreak in a majority of vineyards throughout California.
A worker inspects cabernet sauvignon wine grapes at the Stags' Leap Winery September 27, 2004 in Napa, California. The 2004 California wine harvest kicked off during the last week of July, at least two weeks ahead of schedule due to unusually warm weather at the beginning of March, which triggered budbreak in a majority of vineyards throughout California.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Vineyards throughout California are keeping track of the weather - particularly in relation to climate change.

According to a recent study in the journal Nature, vintners are having trouble predicting how their wines are going to taste, because old weather patterns have gone out the window.

Take Two's A. Martinez spoke with Benjamin Cook, climate scientist with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies about his study.