News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

Drip irrigation saves water, but may harm wildlife




BIGGS, CA - MAY 08: A farmer walks on the banks of a flooded rice field on May 8, 2015 in Biggs, California. As California enters its fourth year of severe drought, a lack of water has rice farmers are cutting back on their annual plantings which has left many crop dusting and seed planting operations with half of the work as normal. According to the California Rice Commission, 434,000 acres of rice were planted in 2014 compared to 567,000 in the previous year. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
BIGGS, CA - MAY 08: A farmer walks on the banks of a flooded rice field on May 8, 2015 in Biggs, California. As California enters its fourth year of severe drought, a lack of water has rice farmers are cutting back on their annual plantings which has left many crop dusting and seed planting operations with half of the work as normal. According to the California Rice Commission, 434,000 acres of rice were planted in 2014 compared to 567,000 in the previous year. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Listen to story

06:17
Download this story 15MB

It should be warm and sunny this weekend... with little chance of rain here in Southern California. And no showers expected up north, either.

The drought, it seems, hasn't loosened its grip, and that's been tough on farmers throughout the state.

But it's been especially bad for those who grow rice, up in Yolo County, near Sacramento.

Rice is traditionally grown in paddies - fields flooded with water.

But this week, a 17 thousand acre farm known as Conway Ranch announced plans to experiment with drip irrigation.

For more on these efforts, Take Two's Alex Cohen spoke to Andrea Jones. She's the director of bird conservation at Audobon, an advocate for wildlife preservation

To hear the full conversation, click the blue player above.