News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

International criminals, politicians could have a rough week, thanks to the Panama Papers.




Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a meeting in the Novo-Ogaryov residence outside Moscow on Monday, April 4, 2016.  The spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin, Dmitry Peskov has dismissed suggestions of Putin's involvement in an offshore account scheme as a smear likely motivated by
Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a meeting in the Novo-Ogaryov residence outside Moscow on Monday, April 4, 2016. The spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin, Dmitry Peskov has dismissed suggestions of Putin's involvement in an offshore account scheme as a smear likely motivated by "Putinophobia." (Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
Alexei Druzhinin/AP

Listen to story

07:57
Download this story 11MB

A massive data leak from a Panama-based law firm is shining new light on a secret financial underworld — one where dirty money goes in and comes back untraceable on the other side.

To an outside observer, the law firm Mossak Fonseca might seem like your standard global wealth management company. 

But a deeper look into the 11.5 million leaked files reveals that the firm appears to have acted as a middleman for many unsavory characters, including embezzlers, thieves and more than one hundred politicians and public officials from around the world.

Tim Johnson is a reporter and editor for The McClatchy Company and is one of the few American journalists given access to the files. He’s followed the paper trail of Mexican tycoon, Juan Armando Hinojosa Cantu, who worked with the law firm to move at least $100 million.

Press the blue play button above to hear the interview.