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Can California save the race for Bernie Sanders? Probably not. Here’s why.




Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep in his Senate office on Nov. 4, in Washington, D.C.
Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks with NPR's Steve Inskeep in his Senate office on Nov. 4, in Washington, D.C.
Jun Tsuboike/NPR

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The “Excelsior” state has spoken.

Polling closed at 9 Eastern Time Tuesday night. Exit polls quickly called the winners.

On the Republican side, it was New York native Donald Trump by a landslide. The GOP-frontrunner picked up 89 of the state’s 95 delegates, losing just a few to Ohio Governor John Kasich, who pulled a distant second.

Meanwhile, Democrat Hillary Clinton bested Bernie Sanders to clinch the state with 58 percent of the primary pie.

Party delegate rules mean Bernie Sanders still has a shot at the party nomination — but it's a long one.

Sanders’ path to victory hinged on successes in New York and California. Tuesday’s loss may have made it mathematically impossible for Sanders to get the delegates he needs to win.

Take Two talked about the future of the Sanders campaign with Louis DeSipio, professor of political science at UC Irvine.

Press the blue play button above to hear the interview.

Post has been updated.