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Glam Slam West: Prince's club was the celebrity hotspot in the early '90s




MINNEAPOLIS, MN - APRIL 21:  Guests dance to Prince music as a slide show flashes images of the artist above the stage during a memorial dance party at the First Avenue nightclub on April 21, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Prince, 57, was pronounced dead shortly after being found unresponsive at Paisley Park Studios in Chanhassen, Minnesota near Minneapolis.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN - APRIL 21: Guests dance to Prince music as a slide show flashes images of the artist above the stage during a memorial dance party at the First Avenue nightclub on April 21, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Prince, 57, was pronounced dead shortly after being found unresponsive at Paisley Park Studios in Chanhassen, Minnesota near Minneapolis. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images

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While Prince fans around the world mourn his death, we remember his time here in Los Angeles.

Rewind to January 1993. The city was still recovering from the civil unrest of the L.A. riots. Excitement was brewing for the showdown between the Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys at the Pasadena Rose Bowl for Super Bowl 27. And in downtown L.A., a new club debuted — and not just any new celebrity hotspot.

The grand opening of Glam Slam West was attended by the biggest names of the day: C+C Music Factory, Treach from the rap group Naughty by Nature, Evander Holyfield, Jamie Foxx then of "In Living Color," and actress Halle Berry.

In the early '90s, this club was the place to be — because it was co-owned by Prince.

Steve Edelson was the club owner who collaborated with Prince, and he joined Take Two to reminisce on Glam Slam's glory days and what it was like to work with Prince.

Interview Highlights:

On how involved Prince was:

"That was 100 percent Prince, what Glam Slam was going to look like... He wanted to have his own place in Hollywood because of, perhaps, his shyness or his desire to have his own space to do his music, or maybe the way he was treated at other nightclubs around the city... He made a deal with us to get half the club, and after we made the deal we pretty much lost control of the club..."

On his standout Prince memory:

"The Joffrey Ballet commissioned him to do the music for a ballet, and that was very important to him. It happened at the Dorothy Chandler pavilion. They turned the fountain purple that night. Pretty much everyone who was anyone in Prince's world went there, and that was just a wonderful night for him. His family was there and there was a big party afterwards..."

To hear the full interview, click the blue play button above.