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California view: 5 things to watch for at the Democratic National Convention




Workers prepare for the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Sunday, July 24, 2016. Thousands of demonstrators took to Philadelphia’s sweltering streets on Sunday, chanting and beating drums in the first major protests ahead of the Democratic National Convention.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Workers prepare for the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Sunday, July 24, 2016. Thousands of demonstrators took to Philadelphia’s sweltering streets on Sunday, chanting and beating drums in the first major protests ahead of the Democratic National Convention.(AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Paul Sancya/AP

Last week it was the Republicans in Cleveland. This week, the Democrats will take Philly. 

The convention comes a tense time for the party: a DNC email leak Friday on the website Wikileaks is likely to cast a shadow over the week’s proceedings.

Among the 20,000 leaked letters: correspondence that appears to show members of the party conspiring against Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders — who has already endorsed Clinton — has called the controversy “outrageous,” but he says he’s “not surprised.”

Party chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned Sunday amid pressure brought on by those leaks.

The theme for this first day is "United Together," but how do you do that in the midst of yet another email scandal? And what can viewers in California expect this week? 

KQED political reporter Marisa Lagos joined Take Two from the convention with the things she's watching.

1. Angry Bernie Sanders delegates

Lagos was at a breakfast for California delegates Monday morning. She said the anger in the room from Sanders supporters was palpable:

"It was kind of pandemonium... Every single speaker pretty much got booed and taunted when they mentioned Clinton and Kaine. California has 222 Bernie Sanders delegates, so it's a big part of the delegation. It was a lot more chaotic than a lot of us walked in there expecting."

2. Astrid Silva 

Astrid Silva of Nevada was brought to the US from Mexico at a young age. She remains undocumented. Silva will address the convention Monday night. Her relationship with the Democratic Party started when she passed a note to Senator Harry Reid as he was campaigning in 2009. KQED's Marisa Lagos says she has since become the unofficial "face" of the immigration movement:

"She's been talked about by the president in the past and used as an example of why children and young people should be embraced instead of shunned by America. That's really the message that Democrats want to be putting forward this week."

3. Not a lot of worry about California

Marisa Lagos says the Democratic Party isn't concerned about losing California in November:

"I don't think they're worried about California. It's a blue state. I know that Trump's people have been talking about trying to flip it, but I have not talked to a single person who watches these things closely that thinks that is really going to be in play. But I do think that nationally, Clinton needs everyone she can get."

4. Jerry Brown

California Governor Jerry Brown has a history with former President Bill Clinton. For many years, their relationship might best be summed up by Taylor Swift. Marisa Lagos says the hatchet has been buried, however, and Brown is now a valuable asset to Hillary Clinton's campaign. He's slated to address the convention this week:

"I think we're going to see Brown in the role of elder statesman here. He is very well-liked. He has struck a really interesting balance between being a little bit more fiscally conservative than a lot of the Democrats in Sacremento are, but also really expanding immigrant rights and doing a lot of those things the Democrats are trying to draw a contrast with."

5. The ghost of Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

The recently — er — departed Schultz will likely perform in a very limited capacity this week. After a Wikileaks DNC data dump revealed that the former party chair favored Clinton during the primary race, Schultz might serve as more of a distraction this week, KQED's Lagos says:

"I think it's something we're going to be talking about a lot this week, and it certainly adds fuel to the fire for Bernie supporters who already came here already wanting to make a stand and were also very displeased by this weekend's choice of Tim Kaine as Hillary Clinton's running mate, who is seen as more of a moderate Democrat... I am hearing some definite anger from Bernie supporters."

Press the blue play button above to hear the full interview.