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Super spouses: Examining the evolution of presidential plus-ones




Former US president Bill Clinton addresses the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.      / AFP / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Former US president Bill Clinton addresses the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

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Former President Bill Clinton gave a long speech in Philly Tuesday designed to introduce voters to a side of his wife the country doesn't know. 

https://youtu.be/8RchVnIn_-Y?t=1m4s

The former President has stumped for plenty of other candidates, but now he faces a new challenge: going to bat for his wife of more than 40 years.

Candidate spouses and the role they play on the campaign trail has evolved in recent decades: each must find a balance between personal and political. 

For more on how that role has changed over the years, Take Two spoke to Kate Andersen Brower, author of the book "First Women: The Grace and Power of America's Modern First Ladies." 

Press the blue play button above to hear the full interview.