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The challenges of getting young black swimmers in the water




RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 13:  Gold medalists Kathleen Baker, Lilly King, Dana Vollmer, Simone Manuel of the United States celebrate on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women's 4 x 100m Medley Relay Final on Day 8 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 13, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 13: Gold medalists Kathleen Baker, Lilly King, Dana Vollmer, Simone Manuel of the United States celebrate on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women's 4 x 100m Medley Relay Final on Day 8 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 13, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)
Adam Pretty/Getty Images

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Olympic swimmer Simone Manuel won four medals at the Olympics in Rio this summer. She is young, inspiring, and she may even be part of a new generation of young black swimmers. 

According to research from the USA Swimming Foundation and University of Memphis, 70 percent of African American children cannot swim.

Tankeeya Butts is the executive director of the Ohio-based non-profit The Josh Project. She joined Take Two to talk about the organization and inspiring more young black swimmers.

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio player above. 

 



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