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Nearly 10,000 fans asked Madame Tussauds for a Selena figure, they finally got their wish




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Twenty-one years ago today, Selena's album "Dreaming of You" came out. At the time, the release was bittersweet-- the Tejano singer/songwriter and fashion icon didn't live to see her crossover album hit the airwaves. She was shot dead by a friend who was also a former employee just months before.

Since then, the Queen of Tejano music has reached near-mythical status-- her titular biopic launched the career of a young woman named Jennifer Lopez. Now, Madame Tussauds created a wax figure of the Grammy award-winning Selena.

The model will be on display alongside other icons such as Michael Jackson, Marilyn Monroe, and Audrey Hepburn.

It's being revealed today, and fans were already lined up at 9am for the evening event. "Madame Tussauds has turned Hollywood Blvd into a Selena block party!" exclaimed Selena superfan Roger Gomez, who coordinates a Selena tribute at Plaza de la Raza every year. 

Workers in London prepare the iconic bustier for Selena's wax figure.
Workers in London prepare the iconic bustier for Selena's wax figure.
Courtesy of Madame Tussauds

The clamor over having Selena immortalized in wax form started with a change.org peition that garnered nearly 10,000 supporters online. 

The intricate detail is one of the reasons why it takes over six months to make one wax figure for Madame Tussauds.
The intricate detail is one of the reasons why it takes over six months to make one wax figure for Madame Tussauds.
Courtesy of Madame Tussauds

"We have always listened to our visitors to figure out who to create," Colin Thomas told Take Two, "The difference with this one was the incredible outpouring of support of people who hadn't necessarily visited us before."  Thomas said that of all the figures he's been involved with, this one was the most emotional. "When we're working with someone who's no longer living, we have to rely on family, friends, any research material we can get our hands on. We worked closely with her family to make sure we really captured her personality." 

That personality is why, at 9am, the crowd hoping to get in had already reached 300, the max allowed in for the 6pm event. "There even was a woman camped out here last night when I left work," he remarked. "I've literally never seen anything like it."