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A Tale of two Trumps in Mexico and Arizona




 U.S. Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses supporters and the media following primary elections on June 7, 2016 in Briarcliff Manor, New York. Trump spoke to the media at Trump National Golf Club.
U.S. Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses supporters and the media following primary elections on June 7, 2016 in Briarcliff Manor, New York. Trump spoke to the media at Trump National Golf Club.
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Appearances in Mexico and Arizona on Wednesday brought Americans a tale of two Trumps.

In an unexpected move, Donald Trump traveled to Mexico City to meet with President Enrique Peña Nieto. He was noticeably subdued in a joint speech with Peña Nieto — his typical animation was no where to be found. Talking points for the two included NAFTA, and immigration. 

Republican strategist Mike Madrid said this brought legitimacy to his campaign for a moment.

"You started to begin to see, OK wait a second, maybe this candidacy is going to shift into a more reasonable, more level-headed approach to not only foreign policy, but to the candidacy itself," he said. "I think most of the media was suggesting that that was the case too. And literally within three or four hours, you saw a complete pivot back to the red-meat obsession with immigration that has defined this campaign."

Trump arrived in Phoenix, Arizona, within those few hours, fired up about his 10-point plan on immigration. In his speech, Trump highlighted calls for the building of his infamous wall, and an "extreme vetting" process. He's been accused in recent days of flip-flopping his stance on immigration, and Madrid isn't sure that either of these appearances clarified Trump's position.

"I think there may have been a little bit of clarity if anybody was actually looking for some substance on the policy issues, but again I think most people were kind of perplexed from the beginning. This whole event was billed for weeks as a major policy announcement, and it really did take on the characteristics of a typical Trump rally."     

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue audio player above.