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Yosemite's legacy: breathtaking views, and a "toxic, hostile," work environment for women




Almost 20 women have reported experiencing sexual harassment this year at Yosemite National Park, prompting the third federal investigation of the National Park Service since January.
Almost 20 women have reported experiencing sexual harassment this year at Yosemite National Park, prompting the third federal investigation of the National Park Service since January.
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The great outdoors doesn't seem at first blush like a hostile work environment, but for countless women working in the National Park Service, it's exactly that. 

New claims from a total of nearly 20 employees at the beloved Yosemite National Park were brought up at a recent hearing by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee reporting gender discrimination and workplace harassment. Other news claims have also been reported at Yellowstone National Park. 

In January, NPS employees were reporting sexual harassment claims at the Grand Canyon National Park. 

The scope and scale of harassment has been labeled "toxic, hostile, repressive and harassing" by employees at the park service.

Survivors have seen their assailants get promoted within the ranks instead of being investigated for their behavior. 

The investiagtions are uncovering what is turning out to be a decades-long problem within the Parks Service that spans the ranks. 

Take Two talked to Editorial Fellow Lyndsey Gilpin​ at High Country News for more 

To report anonymously harassment within the National Park Service or any federal land agency, click here.