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Local Latino Trump supporter weighs in on #ThatMexicanThing




Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine (L) speaks as Republican candidate for Vice President Mike Pence looks on during the first vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016.
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's running mates carry the race for the White House Tuesday, in their only debate of the campaign with the US elections five weeks away. / AFP / POOL / ANDREW GOMBERT        (Photo credit should read ANDREW GOMBERT/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic candidate for Vice President Tim Kaine (L) speaks as Republican candidate for Vice President Mike Pence looks on during the first vice presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia on October 4, 2016. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's running mates carry the race for the White House Tuesday, in their only debate of the campaign with the US elections five weeks away. / AFP / POOL / ANDREW GOMBERT (Photo credit should read ANDREW GOMBERT/AFP/Getty Images)
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It's the remark that launched a thousand tweets.

Near the end of the debate Tuesday night, Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence seemingly became exasperated by Democrat Tim Kaine:

#ThatMexicanThing

Since then, #ThatMexicanThing has been blowing up online: 
tweet 1

tweet 2

tweet 3

Clearly, Pence's quip did not go over well with Mexican Americans who were already opponents of the Trump-Pence ticket. 

What about Trump supporters?  

For more on that perspective, Donald Trump supporter living here in Southern California, Felix Viega, spoke to Take Two's Alex Cohen.

Interview Highlights

I understand that your grandmother is from Mexico... What was your immediate reaction?  

"Well, my immediate reaction is...that statement that Donald Trump said was really taken out of context and I think he's been unfairly judged with regards to that statement. At the time that that statement was made the Kate Steinle murder was hot news. It was a current event and Donald Trump was referring to some of the people that are coming over were criminals, which is a true statement. I believe that his immigration plan to get the criminals out is the first step in attacking the problem head on. I don't think he gets enough credit for it."

Can you see how to some watching the debate, especially those of Mexican or Latino descent, this might come off as dismissive? 

"Well, I do understand the misconception of that and I do understand how it was not understood in the context that Donald Trump was saying that. I mean you could say the same thing about the 'deplorable' statement that Hillary said about all the Donald Trump supporters. I think that that statement was more broadly encompassing than his statement about some of the people coming over... Look at her statement, how do you think I feel about her statement?

...I see how people would feel that way, I can understand that, but you know my point is that, they're not giving him a fair shake with regards to the statement that he made. I sincerely believe that."

If you were sitting down with one of the people who had tweeted one of those 'That Mexican Thing' tweets, who were clearly angry and upset. What would you say to them? How would you make his case?

"The main thing I would say is that Donald Trump is not a polished politician, he doesn't have all the experience, he's not politically correct, but I'll tell you one thing, what he says is truthful. He doesn't lie about so many things. I remember at the very beginning of the nomination when they asked 'who would support the party?' and they were trying to pin it on him and he was the only one that was honest and raised his hand and says, 'You know, if you're fair with me, I'm gonna be fair with you.' Nobody else did, and then look at what's happened. Bush hasn't supported him, other people haven't supported him. The man tells the truth. The man is straightforward and I would rather have somebody that tells the truth and if a few words come out that don't sound correct, it's much better than what we have right now in the White House, where you have somebody that speaks so eloquently and a lot of the stuff that he says is false."

 To hear the full interview, click the blue play button above.