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The current state of LA's 2024 Olympic bid: 3 things you need to know




The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, venue for two previous Olympic Games, is seen in this on August 26, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. The Coliseum would be renovated and used as the main stadium if the city bids for the 2024 Summer Olympics. The Los Angeles city council is reviewing a $4.1 billion bid proposal for the 2024 Summer Olympics that backers say could produce a surplus of $161 million if the city is awarded a third Summer Games. A 218-page bid book made public on August 25 shows plans for a Los Angeles Games rely on private-sector partners to pay more than $1.7 billion in venue costs and includes revenue projections such as $4.8 billion from ticket sales, broadcast rights and corporate sponsorships.       AFP PHOTO / MARK RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, venue for two previous Olympic Games, is seen in this on August 26, 2015 in Los Angeles, California. The Coliseum would be renovated and used as the main stadium if the city bids for the 2024 Summer Olympics. The Los Angeles city council is reviewing a $4.1 billion bid proposal for the 2024 Summer Olympics that backers say could produce a surplus of $161 million if the city is awarded a third Summer Games. A 218-page bid book made public on August 25 shows plans for a Los Angeles Games rely on private-sector partners to pay more than $1.7 billion in venue costs and includes revenue projections such as $4.8 billion from ticket sales, broadcast rights and corporate sponsorships. AFP PHOTO / MARK RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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And then...there were three. Last week, Rome dropped out of the running to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

That leaves Paris, Budapest and Los Angeles.

The International Olympic Committee will choose a winner at the end of September 2017. But what exactly will the chosen city win? Some think that aside from the prestige of being an Olympic city, a title L.A. has already worn twice, that winning host status only leaves cities with a big, fat bill to pay. 

For more, Janet Evans, five-time Olympic medalist and Vice-Chair of athlete relations for L.A. 2024 spoke with Take Two's host A Martinez about where L.A. stands in the process of its Olympic bid. 

What role do athletes play in the city's bid?

The IOC, International Olympic Committee, has made it clear that athletes need to be involved in every process of a city bid. Clearly, the president of the IOC is an Olympian, an Olympic champion from 1976 so his goal is to have athletes present and have athletes be a part of it. As an athlete, there are things that I can see in our bid plans and others that  might not be caught by a business leader or an executive. So, athletes are involved in our bid at every level.

What's next on the to-do list? 

Just delivered our second deliverable to the IOC just about 10 days ago and that talked about our venues, offering our locations of the venues, our world class facilities. So, we made the IOC aware of those and now we're working on our third deliverable which goes into even more detail about what our bid will be. We have an evaluation commission of the IOC coming out in the spring to look at our venues.

L.A.'s greatest strength in their bid? Existing venues

Our venues are here. There are no surprises. There are no things that need to be massively built. You think about the world class existing venues that our study has from Staples, to the Coliseum, to the Rose Bowl, Pauley Pavillion, StubHub, you name it. It makes our bid low risk. It makes it sustainable and it makes us feel like it's the right bid at the right time...

To hear the full interview, click the blue play button above.