News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 9 to 10 a.m.
Arts & Entertainment

Pachucos to party crews: Art show uncovers a different side of LA's youth culture




An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
'Hacienda,' a sculpture by Juan Capistran, recreates the modern house party scene of Latino youth.
An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
A speaker fills the inside of 'Hacienda,' a sculpture by Juan Capistran, recreates the modern house party scene of Latino youth.
An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
T-shirts like Fresh Jive were popular in the 1990s, and have been preserved in Guadalupe Rosales' archive.
An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
Photographs taken 40 years apart by Oscar Castillo and Rafael Cardenas show comparisons in resistance strategies among youth.
An installation of zoot suits from the 1940s, by John Carlos de Luna (aka Barrio Dandy).
Guadalupe Rosales (left) stands with Take Two host A Martinez (center) and VPAM director Pilar Tompkins Rivas (right).


Listen to story

11:50
Download this story 5.0MB

Youth culture in Los Angeles is often represented by carefree surfer dudes, or bubbly teenage girls hitting the mall.

But one art show in East LA is putting a new perspective on what it means to be a young Angeleno.

Tastemakers/Earthshakers: Notes from Los Angeles Youth Culture, 1943-2016, explores how young Latinos have forged their own spaces and identities across time.

Fashion displays, videos and music, and even old issues of beloved publications like Street Beat magazine bring to life decades of Latino youth culture, from the pachucos and pachucas of the 1940s, to the party crew scene of the 1980s and 1990s.

Copies of Street Beat magazine, from Guadalupe Rosales' archive.
Copies of Street Beat magazine, from Guadalupe Rosales' archive.

Some artists even speculate about what the future could hold for LA's young Latinos.

A post-apocalyptic speculation on the future of Latino youth culture, curated and organized by Mario Ibarra with help from various artists.
A post-apocalyptic speculation on the future of Latino youth culture, curated and organized by Mario Ibarra with help from various artists.
A feed of the Veteranas and Rucas Instagram account, created by Guadalupe Rosales, will be on display at the Tastemakers/Earthshakers art show
A feed of the Veteranas and Rucas Instagram account, created by Guadalupe Rosales, will be on display at the Tastemakers/Earthshakers art show

Host A Martinez got a preview of the exhibit with Pilar Tompkins Rivas, director of the Vincent Price Museum at East Los Angeles College. He also spoke with Guadalupe Rosales. She's the creator of the popular Instagram account, Veteranas and Rucas, and one of the artists in the show.

Tastemakers/Earthshakers is open to the public now. For more information, click here.