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California Democrats eye a possible supermajority in the state legislature




The California State Assembly met for an organizational session where lawmakers took the oath of office at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., on Dec.  1, 2014.
The California State Assembly met for an organizational session where lawmakers took the oath of office at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., on Dec. 1, 2014.
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

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Democratic lawmakers in California are hoping to regain a supermajority in the capitol this November. 

While Republicans, once the dominant party in the Golden State, are now struggling to hold on to what remaining influence they have.

What would a Democratic supermajority in the state legislature mean for California?

CALmatters reporter Laurel Rosenhall explains that a 2/3 majority for Democrats would mean that they'd be able to raise taxes, change ethics laws, and put constitutional amendments on the ballot without the need to compromise with Republicans.

Democrats have held a supermajority in the legislature before, though. So what would be different this time around?

Rosenhall explains that because of a change to term limits, a supermajority this time around would have the potential to alter the balance of power in the legislature for several years to come.

To hear the full interview with Laurel Rosenhall, click the blue player above.