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Koreans in SoCal glued to political drama in Seoul




South Korea's president-elect Park Geun-Hye waves to supporters as she arrives to deliver a victory speech on a stage in the centre of Seoul on December 19, 2012. South Korea elected its first female president on December 19, handing a slim but historic victory to conservative ruling party candidate Park Geun-Hye, daughter of the country's former military ruler.
South Korea's president-elect Park Geun-Hye waves to supporters as she arrives to deliver a victory speech on a stage in the centre of Seoul on December 19, 2012. South Korea elected its first female president on December 19, handing a slim but historic victory to conservative ruling party candidate Park Geun-Hye, daughter of the country's former military ruler.
JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

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South Korea's president is going through what some are calling the worst crisis of power in the country for decades. It involves a secret confidant, close family ties and questions of influence and favors at the highest level of the government. It all has the Korean community in Southern California closely watching developments.

"It's a very strange situation," said David Kang, director of the Korean Studies Institute at the University of Southern California. "They [the Korean community L.A.] are reacting like Koreans in Korea are reacting: with bafflement and in many cases with just outrage."

Click the blue audio player above to hear the full interview.