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Awkward no more: Election-fueled rifts could soon cease




Citizens vote on Election Day at Fire Station #71 in Alhambra, Los Angeles County, on November 6, 2012 in California, as Americans flock to the polls nationwide to decide between President Barack Obama, his Rebuplican challenger Mitt Romney, and a wide range of other issues. Alhambra is one of 6 cities in California's 49th Assembly District, the state's first legislative district where Asian-Americans make up the majority of the population. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN        (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Citizens vote on Election Day at Fire Station #71 in Alhambra, Los Angeles County, on November 6, 2012 in California, as Americans flock to the polls nationwide to decide between President Barack Obama, his Rebuplican challenger Mitt Romney, and a wide range of other issues. Alhambra is one of 6 cities in California's 49th Assembly District, the state's first legislative district where Asian-Americans make up the majority of the population. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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Election Day is just hours away. 

For people across the country and even here in Southern California, Tuesday can't come soon enough. No, not because they're hopping up and down to take part in the democratic process (though that might be a part). 

For many, tomorrow marks the end of uncomfortable and sometimes stressful conversations with friends and family over issues that have polarized the country.

Take Two asked listeners to share their experiences. Sandra Harrison and Mary Perez told their tales to Take Two. 

Mary's Story:

This election season has had a distinct impact, particularly on my mom and I.

We are both staunch Republicans who believe in fiscal responsibility and limited government, so there's never been an election where we have disagreed about who we would vote for or rather if we would vote at all.

My mother believes in the 'lesser of two evils' argument — that she must support Mr. Trump because he will nominate conservative Supreme Court Justices and will appeal Obamacare.

I believe that it is our right not to vote for either candidate. While I agree with my mother that it would be detrimental to our country to elect Secretary Clinton, I think Mr. Trump will tarnish the conservative message.

I will absolutely be relieved when the election is over. I'm still optimistic, no matter what happens, and I still believe the right to vote is one of the greatest constitutional rights that make our country so great.

Sandy's Story:

This election has had a tremendous impact on my relationships with people I love.

I question their news source; they think that my news source is questionable. I think their candidate is a lunatic; they think mine is a lying crook. There's really no middle ground.

On Facebook and Twitter, I have tried to keep people with different opinions in my feeds because I don't want to only surround myself with people who look and think like me, but it's hard, and it's hard to know how to engage with them without tearing into the relationship.

So instead, I've settled for surface, and I'm hoping that once Tuesday comes, we can return to conversations of depth.

The issue we disagree with the most is probably immigration. I and most of my family come from a Christian worldview, so it startles me, it horrifies me when I hear what they say, or when I see the memes, they post about immigrants and closing our borders.

My hope for the nation after the election is that we can find common ground, middle ground and that whichever candidate is in office, that the people who are on the margins will feel heard and that things will be done to bring them into the circle of this amazing country that we are.

(Answers have been edited for clarity.)