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For one evangelical leader, President-elect Trump an imperfect champion in faith fight




Pastors from the Las Vegas area pray with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a visit to the International Church of Las Vegas, and International Christian Academy, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
Pastors from the Las Vegas area pray with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a visit to the International Church of Las Vegas, and International Christian Academy, Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
Evan Vucci/AP

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Yesterday in churches and other houses of worship across the state and the country, faith leaders spoke to their congregants about how to process the presidential election. 

For some, it's been a time of mourning and grief; for others, it's a step in the right direction. To Jim Garlow, senior pastor at Skyline Church in La Mesa, Donald Trump represents a political bulwark: a self-serving sinner turned public servant for the Lord, tasked now with righting the course of a nation on the verge of abandoning its Biblical roots. 

Garlow spoke with Take Two's Alex Cohen. 

Highlights 

A lot of people have expressed concerns about the words that Donald Trump has used to describe women, Muslims, the disabled. You have mentioned that you served on President-elect Trump's faith advisory council. What has the conversation been like about how the President-elect can best reach out to all communities to heal some of the rifts that we're seeing?

On the faith advisory council, there are people of integrity, and we try to walk in righteousness and holiness, and so there's been some very firm and strong confrontations. Most of us don't have direct access to him — I've only been a phone conversation with him once — but there are people on our council that have confronted him strongly on these very issues, and I would have to say that he's not been defensive. 

He's been very teachable. He deserved correction; he needed correction, and he received it. His response to one of the most forceful confrontations was he said to the person 'will you come stay at our home tonight and fly with me on the plane the next two days?' This is right after the Access Hollywood tape came out. So we see — internally — a man who seems to be highly teachable in these areas, and, well, he should be in these areas. I don't defend those things that are said that are morally offensive. 

We as evangelicals took a hard look at the constant corruption of Hillary Clinton: we'd looked at her platform — there's hardly a single thing that I can agree with. 

Press the blue play button above to hear the interview in its entirety. 

(Question and answer have been edited for clarity and brevity.)