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One professor says that most of Trump's border wall is already built




In this May 1, 2016 picture, Eva Lara, second from right, reacts as she reaches for her grandmother Juana Lara through the border wall during a brief visitation near where Mexico and the United States meet at the Pacific Ocean in San Diego. Lara, who lives in the United States legally through legislation that temporarily prevents young immigrants from being deported, has not seen her grandmother since the family left Mexico when she was three years old. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
In this May 1, 2016 picture, Eva Lara, second from right, reacts as she reaches for her grandmother Juana Lara through the border wall during a brief visitation near where Mexico and the United States meet at the Pacific Ocean in San Diego. Lara, who lives in the United States legally through legislation that temporarily prevents young immigrants from being deported, has not seen her grandmother since the family left Mexico when she was three years old. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
Gregory Bull/AP

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Back to that notion of a wall between Mexico and the US. 

We heard a lot of talk about plans to build a wall during the presidential campaign.

Now the election is over -- what happens to those plans?

Our next guest insists not only will that border wall BE built... he says much of it, in fact, is already there. 

Peter Andreas wrote a column on this for the Washington Post.

He's a political science professor at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Relations.

Andreas spoke with Take Two's Alex Cohen 

On the slippery definition of the word "wall"

At first glance the term wall seems very solid, in fact that's precisely why many Trump supporters like it. Because it seems very clear and solid and something formidable, but if you actually look up definitions of what a wall is, it's amazing how fuzzy the term can be.

For example, the Oxford dictionary says it's any high vertical surface especially one that is vertical in scale. By that definition it seems like there's a lot of wiggle room. It could be fencing, concrete, metal barriers of various sorts.

And then you look at what already have along the border: A 2,000 mile long border of which there's some form of barriers along almost 700 miles of it. Portions of it look like a pretty formidable metal wall. The polite word used in the pre-Trump world was a, "fence," or a, "barrier," but many people could also describe it as a wall.

To hear the full conversation, click the blue player above.