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Politics

Trump's 'throw-up-your-hands' approach to cybersecurity worries experts




NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 19:  Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks after winning the New York state primary on April 19, 2016 in New York City. Trump held the press conference at Trump Tower in Manhattan.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 19: Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks after winning the New York state primary on April 19, 2016 in New York City. Trump held the press conference at Trump Tower in Manhattan. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore/Getty Images

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No computer is safe.

That's the alarming message from President-elect Donald Trump. The soon-to-be new resident of the White House doesn't use anything more technical than a cellphone. No computers. No email.

He suggested over the weekend that we should write notes and send via courier to get around online security issues. The message this sends to foreign hackers has cybersecurity experts more than a little concerned. And has raised questions about what could happen to US online security policies under Trump.

A Martinez spoke with Kristen Eichensehr, assistant professor at UCLA School of Law, who specializes in cybersecurity.

"The idea that you just sort of throw up your hands and say, 'nothing can ever be secure so why try,'—that's a really dangerous posture and it's really a fundamental challenge to how cybersecurity has been handled in the United States and in other countries across the world for the last several decades," Eichensehr says.
 

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue media player above.