News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

Dakota Access Pipeline gets the go-ahead after executive action




CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30:  Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the  Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Listen to story

06:21
Download this story 9.0MB

With the stroke of a pen Tuesday, President Trump delt a major blow to activists protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. 

In what might be seen as a win for the energy sector, Trump signed executive action advancing construction near culturally sensitive sites. 

He also greenlit the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, previously halted under President Obama. 

Opponents of the Dakota Pipeline have said their concerns are not just environmental; they're also moral.

For more, Take Two spoke to Joely Proudfit, professor of American Indian Studies at California State University San Marcos. 

Press the blue play button above to hear the full interview.