News and culture through the lens of Southern California.
Hosted by A Martínez
Airs Weekdays 2 to 3 p.m.

K2 Sports: a look at All Star Games after NBA players get to cast their votes




TORONTO, CANADA - FEBRUARY 14:  Paul Gasol waves to the fans prior to the NBA All-Star Game as part of the 2016 NBA All Star Weekend on February 14, 2016 at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2016 NBAE (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
TORONTO, CANADA - FEBRUARY 14: Paul Gasol waves to the fans prior to the NBA All-Star Game as part of the 2016 NBA All Star Weekend on February 14, 2016 at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2016 NBAE (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE/Getty Images

Listen to story

13:13
Download this story 9MB

On this week's installment of K2 Sports, Andy and Brian Kamenetzky join Take Two's A Martinez for a deep look into  NBA All Star Games.

Why NBA players got a chance to vote on who plays in the All Star Game: 

"There's been some controversy over what fans do. A few years ago when voting was opened up to the internet for example, Yao Ming, the great Center for China was by far and away the leading vote-getter which was fine in years when he was playing. But as many people might remember, he had a lot of years where he was hurt with foot problems and all that. And he would still become the leading vote-getter because he was obviously very popular in China where they have a whole lot of people. 

And so over the years, there's been— as voting's been opened up to fans on the web— instances of players that become kind of cult heroes and get really close to being voted in to the All Star Game. Last year for example, it was Zaza Pachulia.... He was not a worthy player for the All Star Game. And fans, because his name is Zaza Pachulia and he's kind of fun... was very nearly voted into one of the All Star spots. 

And so what happened is, the NBA decided, in an effort to make it a little more fair and to keep people like Zaza Pachulia from earning a spot in the All Star Game , to split it up.... They give fans still half the vote and they'd give players half the vote. The idea being that players would be a little more responsible with their voting than fans would be."

Quotes edited for clarity

To listen to the interview, click on the blue media player above 



You care about today's news. And you're not alone.

Join others who support independent journalism.