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'Right intentions, but ill-planned': SoCal Republicans divided over Trump immigration order




President Donald Trump pauses as he looks at his notes during a meeting with business leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump pauses as he looks at his notes during a meeting with business leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Evan Vucci/AP

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President Trump put pen to paper several times last week, to fulfill promises made on the campaign trail. Several of his executive orders have sparked condemnation from Democrats. But one action, signed late Friday, has Republicans divided along ideological lines. 

The order suspends refugee admissions for 120 days and prohibits travel from seven countries for 90. For Trump loyalists, like Mike Simpfenderfer, it's welcome news: 

"Mr. Trump spent many months making it very clear [that] we have some serious problems with people coming in from different parts of the world that support terrorism and he was going to take action," Simpfenderfer told Take Two. 

A longtime Trump supporter, Simpfenderfer now leads the advocacy group "Make California Great Again." 

Simpfenderfer says Trump's decision was a wise one, despite the fact that the perpetrators of the attacks that Trump often cited as motivating factors for the suspension — the San Bernardino attacks, the Orlando club massacre and 9/11 — would not have been prevented from entering the country under his order. 

All Republicans don't share the sentiments of Simpfenderfer. Mary Perez, a Republican who has long opposed what Trump stands for, took a different view on Trump's order:

"[It] might have been with the right intentions of providing national security to us, I think, though, it was ill-planned, and he should have consulted members of Congress first," Perez says. 

Mary Perez is the vice president of the USC College Republicans. She says Trump's executive order doesn't reflect the values of her party, and that it could have greater repercussions going forward: 

"What this executive order seems to do is propagate the US in a war against Islam, which is something that we absolutely don't want," Perez says. 

She adds that the order could damage the image of Republicans and the US as a whole. 

"It doesn't reflect well on us. It really devalues our international credibility with other nations and our foreign diplomacy," Perez says. 

To listen to the full interview, click on the blue media player above.