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Does the ‘day without a woman’ strike exclude some women?




LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 21:  Participants seen during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Downtown Los Angeles for the Women's March in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Women's Marches are being held in cities around the world. (Photo by Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 21: Participants seen during the Women's March on January 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Downtown Los Angeles for the Women's March in protest after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Women's Marches are being held in cities around the world. (Photo by Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images)
Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images

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It's been almost a month and a half since the international women's march drew thousands to downtown L.A. and other sites across the country and today, on international women's day, there's another action.

But this time, it's a strike

"A day without a woman" is happening right now, and a number of events are scheduled throughout the day:

L.A. Councilmember Nury Martinez will lead a demonstration by female city employees at today's council meeting.

There's a noon rally scheduled at the LA Civic Center.

And another at three this afternoon at the Federal Building.

The stated goal of the Day Without Women is to rally all gender-oppressed people in a demonstration of economic solidarity. But the execution of the idea has been drawing some criticism.

Maureen Shaw wrote about it in Quartz. She spoke to A Martinez about the strike's unintentional exclusion and how it could be executed better.

To hear the full segment, click the blue play button above.