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For families of Mexico's missing, mass grave discovery ends long and painful search




A view of mass graves on the outskirts of Veracruz city, Veracruz state, on March 16, 2017. 
Over the past six months, Mexican authorities have found at least 242 bodies in clandestine graves discovered on the initiative of mothers whose children have disappeared in the violent state of Veracruz. / AFP PHOTO / ILSE HUESCA        (Photo credit should read ILSE HUESCA/AFP/Getty Images)
A view of mass graves on the outskirts of Veracruz city, Veracruz state, on March 16, 2017. Over the past six months, Mexican authorities have found at least 242 bodies in clandestine graves discovered on the initiative of mothers whose children have disappeared in the violent state of Veracruz. / AFP PHOTO / ILSE HUESCA (Photo credit should read ILSE HUESCA/AFP/Getty Images)
ILSE HUESCA/AFP/Getty Images

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Thousands of people are missing in Mexico. After many years and what some say is insufficient support from authorities, the painstaking task of searching for loved ones often falls on the families of the missing. 

Now, 250 skulls have been unearthed in Veracruz, in what could end up being Mexico's largest mass grave. 

For two mothers, DNA confirmed that some of the remains dug up belong to their missing sons, ending their years-long search.

For more on the discovery and what it means to the families of the missing, Take Two's Libby Denkmann spoke with Patrick McDonnell, Mexico City Bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times.

To listen to the interview, click on the blue Media Player above. 



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