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Ride into the Sun: The science and cultural history of eclipses




Picture taken on February 26, 2017 showing the moon moving to cover the sun for an annular solar eclipse, as seen from the Estancia El Muster, near Sarmiento, Chubut province.
Picture taken on February 26, 2017 showing the moon moving to cover the sun for an annular solar eclipse, as seen from the Estancia El Muster, near Sarmiento, Chubut province.
ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images

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Scientists and people living in North America are abuzz over the total solar eclipse that’s expected to take place on August 21 this year. It’s the first total sun eclipse to happen in continental US since 1979.

A total solar eclipse happens once every couple of years, but the phenomenon still draws big crowds and curious onlookers. In the new book, “Mask of the Sun,” writer John Dvorak look at the significance different cultures and people have assigned to both solar and lunar eclipses. Ancient Romans thought that people shouldn’t have sex during an eclipse, and even today, some pregnant women in Mexico wear safety pins on their underwear during one.

John Dvorak will be talking about his new book, "Mask of the Sun" today, March 22, at 1pm at Vroman's Bookstore in Pasadena  

Guest:

John Dvorak, a tech writer and author of numerous books, including his latest, “Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses” (Pegasus Books, 2017)



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