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AG Jeff Sessions wants a review of all consent decrees, here's how it worked for the LAPD




Attorney General Jeff Sessions, right, accompanied by White House press secretary Sean Spicer, talks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions, right, accompanied by White House press secretary Sean Spicer, talks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017.
Andrew Harnik/AP
Attorney General Jeff Sessions, right, accompanied by White House press secretary Sean Spicer, talks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017.
Civil rights attorney Constance "Connie" Rice
Stephen Weissbart/flickr


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This week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered the Justice Department to review all police reform agreements across the United States. These agreements are known as consent decrees.

The move is seen as signifying the stance the Trump administration has to law enforcement.

The consent decree process is one the Los Angeles Police Department knows well.

In 2001, the Justice Department put the LAPD under a consent decree after the beating of motorist Rodney King and the infamous Rampart Scandal.

Major reforms were put in place, and in 2013 the consent decree was lifted.

Civil rights attorney Connie Rice worked on those reforms and talked to us about it.

(click on the blue arrow to hear the segment)