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Rivers are more treacherous because of snowmelt




Los Angeles Fire Department's Swift Water Rescue personnel search for a possible deceased individual on an island in the middle of the LA River near the Atwater Village neighbourhood during a rain storm in Los Angeles, California on January 12, 2017.  
A series of storms that have rolled across California in the past week dumping heavy rain and snow could herald the end of a punishing historic drought, officials said. / AFP / Konrad Fiedler        (Photo credit should read KONRAD FIEDLER/AFP/Getty Images)
Los Angeles Fire Department's Swift Water Rescue personnel search for a possible deceased individual on an island in the middle of the LA River near the Atwater Village neighbourhood during a rain storm in Los Angeles, California on January 12, 2017. A series of storms that have rolled across California in the past week dumping heavy rain and snow could herald the end of a punishing historic drought, officials said. / AFP / Konrad Fiedler (Photo credit should read KONRAD FIEDLER/AFP/Getty Images)
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Over the past several months, California amassed a record snowpack.

But as temperatures rise and that snow melts, the state's rivers are turning into more treacherous waters.

Just last weekend, three people died and 24 more needed to be rescued at Kern River in Central California.

Mike Mohler, battalion chief for CalFIRE, joined Take Two with some advice if you plan to have fun near a river this summer.