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LA is like NYC? Fuggedaboutit!




A family walks by the Statue of Liberty on the first day it is open to the public after Hurricane Sandy on July 4, 2013 on the Liberty Island in New York City.
A family walks by the Statue of Liberty on the first day it is open to the public after Hurricane Sandy on July 4, 2013 on the Liberty Island in New York City.
Kena Betancur/Getty Images

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New York-based culture magazine Nylon had a recent story, "The New Yorker’s Guide To Los Angeles."

"For those New Yorkers aiming to say goodbye to all that but looking to maintain some semblance of their New York life, there are a few L.A. neighborhoods that’ll feel especially like home," the story reads.

Like taking on the 10 to the 405 in rush hour, people in L.A. are not having it.

"Nylon decided to try and jump into the 'New York is like this, LA is like this' editorial swamp, and so far it hasn’t turned out well for them at all," writes Farley Elliott of Eater L.A.

But KPCC tapped two staffers who used to live in L.A. to get their read on the read.

"The people who wrote this list were saying something about themselves in terms of what they're able to afford and how they're able to spend their time," says Julia Paskin, who grew up in Greenwich Village.

"This is a New York magazine. It's mostly for a New York audience, so I'm totally not surprised that they're looking at L.A. from this very New York perspective," adds Leo Duran, who lived in Brooklyn for five years before moving to L.A. "And this entire list is basically for hipsters, by hipsters. That's okay."

According to Nylon, Silver Lake is L.A.'s version of Williamsburg in NYC, and Echo Park is the Bushwick of Los Angeles.

Those are pretty spot-on comparisons.

"Just in terms of where they're at in their gentrification, they seem very much on par," says Paskin, since hipsters of Silver Lake moved to Echo Park when they got priced out.

"People, when they got priced out of Williamsburg, they ended up going out to Bushwick," says Duran.

But Venice is like Red Hook in Brooklyn? Never in a New York minute.

"I lived in Red Hook," says Duran, "and the only thing that's similar between them is that they're on the water."

A better comparison to Red Hook is the Arts District, he says. 

"Red Hook is what I called res-industrial — that's residential and industrial. It was mostly filled with warehouses and some homes," he says. "And that's what the Arts District is becoming right now."

Venice isn't even Coney Island, another comparison Nylon makes.

"Besides water being there and a boardwalk, I have no idea what they're drawing at there," says Paskin. "Venice is not an amusement park to begin with."

But really, neither she nor Duran were that bothered by the whole piece.

"It's not an inclusive list, but they never said they were going to be inclusive," she says.

"L.A is L.A. Let it be its own thing. If people want to compare it, I'm okay with that," adds Duran. "It means more people think about L.A. than we think about them; we're too busy being great."