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These plastic strips are meant to keep street racers at bay




FILE - This Feb. 26, 2015 file photo shows skid marks visible along Plummer Street in the Chatsworth section of Los Angeles following an early-morning illegal street racing crash that killed two bystanders. Henry Gevorgyan, 21, suspected of driving the heavily-modified Mustang that crashed, turned himself in Saturday evening, Feb. 28, 2015. He has been booked on suspicion of murder and is being held on $2 million bail, jail records show. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)
FILE - This Feb. 26, 2015 file photo shows skid marks visible along Plummer Street in the Chatsworth section of Los Angeles following an early-morning illegal street racing crash that killed two bystanders. Henry Gevorgyan, 21, suspected of driving the heavily-modified Mustang that crashed, turned himself in Saturday evening, Feb. 28, 2015. He has been booked on suspicion of murder and is being held on $2 million bail, jail records show. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)
Nick Ut/AP

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The streets of Chatsworth just got a little louder.

Drivers in this northern San Fernando Valley neighborhood traveling on Plummer Street, between Canoga Avenue and Topanga Canyon, are now being greeted by a very loud sound. Sort of sounds like a...bap-bap-bap-bap-bap.

That's the sound tires make as they hit the so-called 'Rumble Strips.' They're the city's latest effort to deter street racers.

Rumble Strips in Chatsworth.
Rumble Strips in Chatsworth.
Via NBC4

Mitch Englander is the councilman for the area, and he spoke to A Martinez to explain how these strips work.

The rumble strips were implemented after decades of street racing had coined the term, 'Canoga Speedway.' Two years ago, a deadly crash claimed the life of two people and injured another. It was the final straw needed to take action:

“We needed to come up with something besides just more enforcement. We had a special task force that was put together by the Los Angeles Police Department but these racers have gotten very sophisticated.”

And it seems the strips have already been effective. Traffic has slowed down in the area by 10 percent:

"We've seen already a great success. They have this little vibration, as well as a sound when you go over them. Not loud enough where it would impede or create a nuisance to the neighbors."

To hear how the strips work, what they're made of and more, click the blue play button above.