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Social media users ID Charlottesville demonstrators on the Internet




CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 12:  A counter-demonstrator marches down the street after the
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 12: A counter-demonstrator marches down the street after the "Unite the Right" rally, a gathering of white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" was declared an unlawful gathering August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. After clashes with anti-fascist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and people were forced out of Lee Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Some are taking to Twitter and other social media platforms to out the identities of participants in the weekend's white-supremacy march in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Twitter handle @YesYoureRacist has been posting photos, names and - in some cases - employer information about people who participated. One Bay Area man lost his job as a result. 

It's all part of a larger trend called "doxxing," or posting documents and other information about someone's identity to publicly shame that person.  

Whitney Phillips is an assistant professor of literary studies and writing at Mercer University and author of "This is Why We Can't Have Nice Things: Mapping the Relationship between Online Trolling and Mainstream Culture."

Take Two spoke to her about this history and the impacts of doxxing. Here's an excerpt from that interview:

"As online interactions have become more and more tethered to our persistent offline identities, doxxing has become increasingly prominent and is used as sort of a punitive tool, both for racists and anti-racists ... They both use it to shame and potentially harm people who are engaged in behaviors that they designate as unacceptable, or worthy of punishment."

To listen to the full segment, click on the blue play button above. 



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